Pros and Cons of Credit Cards: Swipe?

As with almost everything in life, there are both pros and cons of credit cards. Nothing is quite perfect. The question is do the pros outweigh the con? I do not think that the answer will be the same for each person, as everyone has a different financial situation, different characteristics, different strengths, and weaknesses. Therefore, anyone who is considering applying must understand the pros and cons of credit cards so they can answer that question for themselves.

Good and Bad Facts About Credit Cards

This article is a pretty comprehensive list that you can use to make credit card decisions. You may be in limbo about whether or not you should apply for one, and that is completely understandable. Some people do really well with credit cards while others are drowning in credit card debt. What is the difference between these people? It is usually that one group handles them responsibly and the other does not.

One advice

When looking for a credit card, make sure you do so by considering only reputable lenders.

Loanry helps you find reputable lenders and connects you with them. How? By leaving your information in the form below, you are giving us enough to work with so we can match you with lenders who may be willing to give you a credit card. You are not obliged to accept offers, but if you want to get them in the next couple of minutes, start here:


Many times, the way a person treats a credit card is based on the knowledge of credit cards or the lack thereof. Knowledge is power, in my opinion, so understanding credit cards gives me more power over them than they have over me. Below is a list of the pros and cons of credit cards to empower you as well.

The Pros of Credit Cardspros and cons personal loans

Ah, yes, the pros, aka the bright side to the cloudy day. When you are truly breaking down the pros and cons of credit cards, it is hard to ignore the following characteristics:

They are Convenient

Let’s be honest: a credit card can be one of the most convenient things ever. You can make purchases before you get paid, and you can purchase items online. You do not have to carry cash, so you decrease the chances of losing your money. And, it is so much quicker to swipe a card than it is to count out cash or write a check- yes, some people still do that.

They Provide Revolving Credit

Credit can have the capability of staying open forever, so long as you are paying the bill. If you pay your balance, it will be there the next time you need it, so you have an ongoing loan available. That is always nice, especially if you find yourself struggling around a certain time every month. If you get paid on the 1st of each month but find yourself need milk and gas on the 27th, you can use the credit card to get you through. Pay the balance when you get paid on the 1st and you will have it again on the 27th if times are tough again.

They Can Help Build Your Credit

Credit cards are a great tool for building your credit if you handle it responsibly. The best way to use a credit card is to have it cover small expenses or bills that you have the money for. Then, immediately pay it off. So, for instance, if you need $20 in gas and have the money on your debit card, use your credit card to pay instead.

When you get home, use your debit card to pay off the $20 on your credit card. This shows you using your credit but you still are not paying anything extra. There is a common myth that you need to let your credit card add debt in order for it to build your credit. That is very simply not true- your credit just needs to be used. And, in fact, the faster you pay the debt, the better it looks.

So, repeat that pattern of using your credit and immediately paying as often as you can. And do try very hard not to use it for something you cannot afford. Otherwise, all of your hard work will go down the drain, and your credit will be messed up instead.

Credit Cards Can Get You Through Tough Times- and Some Not So Tough Ones, Too

If you need gas before you get paid, a credit card can handle it. Emergency room trips and co-pays? Pull out your card. Impromptu date night? All you have to do is a swipe. Really, a credit card can help you through pretty much anything, as long as the amount is within your credit limit.

The Promotions Can Be Awesome

Sometimes, you can find a credit card that offers 0% APR for 6 months or more. These promotions offer a great opportunity to make payments on a purchase without paying interest. I once worked in a mattress retail store where we sold some pretty expensive mattresses. (If you have not been mattress shopping for the last ten years or so, prepare yourself or you will go into sticker shock.)

This retailer is linked with a couple of finance companies, and they would often run promotions for 0% APR for 36 months, or 24 months. Once they offered it for a full five years. These promotions were awesome to me because I am a proponent of good sleep and good mattresses. The promotions gave me the opportunity to guide my customers to a much better mattress than what they could normally afford.

So, if you want to make a large purchase with a credit card, look for one that offers 0% interest for a set period. Doing this is really no different than putting it on layaway since you are not paying any extra. Just be sure you pay the money back before the interest kicks in.pros and cons of credit cards

Some of Them Offer Rewards

I am sure you have seen the commercials. Capital One offers great airline miles, Discover offers double cash back, and so on. Many credit card companies offer great perks for using their card. You might earn some free gas, or over time have enough cashback for a nice night at your favorite restaurant. The rewards may differ, but you should be able to find a card that offers you something you like.

The Cons of Credit Cards

I have always been told that you cannot appreciate the good things unless you know and experience the bad things. In response to that, we will now look at the second portion of the pros and cons of credit cards, otherwise known as the downs.

They are an Ongoing Source of Temptation

While those credit cards are there for you when you need them, they are also there for you when you don’t. For those who feel the need to spend money, having available credit lying around is too much of a temptation. When you are broke, it is easy to tell the difference between what you need and what you do not. When you have money to spend, those lines can get a little blurred.

If you know you will be too tempted to use your credit card, you need to take some precautions. Find a spot to hide it- just do not be like me and hide it so well that even you cannot find it. More so put it out of reach, and out of sight. Maybe you could put it in a lockbox or hide it behind a picture frame. Basically, anywhere that it is not so easy to grab yet easy enough you can get to it when you need it is a good place.

I cannot really remember when but some amount of years ago, there was a commercial about impulse purchases and credit card debt. The lady was standing in her kitchen when some ad came on her TV. She rushed to the freezer to get her credit card out- she had literally frozen her card. She went through a series of things trying to break and melt the ice before the commercial with the phone number went off.

Fortunately for her, she could not get to her card in time, and she could not see the numbers because the ice blurred them. This commercial still goes through my mind when I consider impulse purchases. While the ice was a drastic measure, it was also an effective one.

The idea behind this is that when temptation arises, you cannot immediately give in. You actually have to put in some effort. Hopefully, by the time you have got the card in your hand, you have decided whether what you are going for it is really worth it. Most often, you will probably find it is not.

Credit Card Payments are Another Bill

I hate bills. I hate them with a passion- as my granddaddy used to say, which always seemed a bit redundant to me since the definition of hate is actually passionate dislike. Anyway, I really hate bills. I, unwillingly, came to terms with the fact that some bills are never going to end. At least not unless I decide to live completely off of the land. If I already have to deal with the necessary bills that I despise, why would I want to add another unnecessary one? Though having a credit card in your wallet is not necessarily costing you, using it does.

The Interest- Need I Say More?

I probably don’t need to, but I will anyway. Though sometimes necessary, interest is never fun. Technically, it is money that you do not get to enjoy in any way. It is simply the fee you have to pay for borrowing the money. I understand why credit card companies charge interest. They are loaning you money and taking a risk in doing so.

What I do not understand is why consumers put themselves into a position to owe interest when it is not necessary. Using your credit card because your baby runs out of diapers or your power is about to get cut off is one thing. It may still not be fun but at least it is justifiable. Using that card to go to a Lakers game you cannot afford is just adding a bill. When it is at all possible, save the money for your purchase instead.

They Can Destroy Your Credit

We talked previously about the fact that credit cards can build your credit. Though that is true, they can also destroy your credit if you are not responsible to them. And this is a major factor when comparing the pros and cons of credit cards. Interest gets calculated and added each month to your bill. If you do not pay that interest and some of the principle, your debt will grow. The more money you owe on your credit card, the higher your credit utilization- which is something you do not want.

Smart Money Tip!

Credit utilization should be around 30% or less. If the interest on your credit card grows, your credit utilization could show as high as 100%- way above the sweet spot. If you must use your credit card, use as little of it as possible, and pay as much as you can.

Sometimes They Come With Fees

As if paying interest is not enough, sometimes credit cards come with additional fees. Some of these fees include annual fees, monthly service fees, late payment fees, return payment fees, foreign transaction fees, balance transfer fees, cash withdrawal fees… I will stop there but you get the idea.

You cannot judge all credit cards by the fees of another because not all cards charge fees. Those that do are adding to the bill. It is important to check terms and conditions for any associated fees and make an educated decision according to that information. If there are any fees attached, weigh that fee against the benefits of the card. I would not mind paying a $29 annual fee if I received $200 or more in cash back on groceries. Visit some online card shops, look into a few cards, and judge on a case by case basis.

Identity Theft is Easier with Credit Cards

There was once a time when every transaction was taken care of in-person and with either cash or some form of trade. Back then, it was hard to steal someone’s identity. Well, maybe it was not so much hard since someone could use your name. However, they could not clean out your bank account with a keystroke.

Even if they used your name and acted terribly across the nation, who would know? There was no way to track someone digitally so your boss would not run your name and find out you have credit issues. In this digital age, though, it is all too easy to steal someone’s identity and destroy them. Every time I turn around I hear about some new way that it is happening.

And credit cards do not help the matter. Do you know how easy it is for someone to skim credit card information off of gas pumps now? I think it says something about the state of our world that we need tamper indication seals on gas pumps. And worse, tech-savvy people, or just those with the right equipment, have to do no more than get close to you to transfer your credit card info to their device.

Online ID Theft Can Be Worse

So if you carry credit cards around, be cautious. When you make an online or mobile purchase, check-in the web address bar for the lock emblem- that tells you the site is secure. If that is not on the checkout page, back it up and find one that does. Also, if you choose to pay at the pump, check the seal. It is usually a yellow or red color and specifically says, “If this seal is broken, do not use and inform the cashier”.

The wording may differ from place to place, but it means the same thing. If that tape is broken, there is a really good chance that someone has tampered with the card reader. Anyone that is authorized to work on those card readers will have more tape to attach when they are finished.

Credit Cards Usually Have Very Confusing Terms and Conditions

The phrase “terms and conditions” makes my head hurt long before I have even looked at them. I love to read, but all of those tiny, dry words are not my forte. I just need straightforward, basic words. If a person has to read a sentence more than two times and use a dictionary to understand what the words mean, it is simply too much. It is even worse when you put the effort forward to read them only to be met with confusing terms.

Unfortunately, it is really important that you know them, so what do you do? You have a few options. The first is to get on the credit card company’s website and visit the Help section and the FAQs. The information you find there will probably tell you what you really need to know. You can even Google the card itself and see if there are any easy to read posts about it. Or you can call the credit card company and have someone sit on the line with you and break down the terms and conditions.

The Rewards are Sometimes Complicated, Useless, or Both

I love rewards. Who doesn’t? Rewards are awesome- well, they can be. A credit card that gives rewards definitely catches people’s attention, but what happens if they are rewards you care nothing about? If I have a credit card that gets me airline miles, it is wasted. Why? I will be honest- I do not fly. Nope, not doing it.

As many times as people have tried to talk me into it, I have not changed my mind. And, yes, they have quoted me the statistics about flying being safer than driving. Well, I happen to feel like I would survive a crash closer to the ground than I would with a plane plummeting towards the earth, but I digress…

The point is that if the rewards are not relevant to you, why would you care about them? Give me cashback on groceries. With a household of six to feed, including a teenager and two more kids that are almost there, I buy a lot of groceries. Earning some cashback from that would be marvelous.

Even worse, some rewards programs are so complicated, users have no idea what they even have. What good does that do anyone? If rewards are important to you, you can card shop for some that you can use and understand. If you do not care about rewards, just look for a simple credit card. There is no need for complicated if it is not benefiting you in some way.

Credit Card Debt Can Easily Get Out of Control

Like a fungus, interest just continues to grow and spread until credit card debt has taken over your life. Does that sound extreme? Sadly, it is all too real. That is why there are so many debt consolidation companies- they would not be popping up everywhere if there was not a market for them. And that market is bigger than people like to admit, and it is everywhere.

A week ago, I was driving down the road with the radio on, and suddenly a loud booming voice came over the speaker. A man was explaining that we do not have to have credit card debt and that we should call so this company could get us out of it. The commercial itself did not surprise me. What did is the fact that the guy specifically mentioned my area.

On a very real note, I live in a smallish town surrounded by even smaller towns. It is small enough that when I heard this commercial, I looked around wondering, “Since when do we have enough people living here to justify a target market?” I literally spent the rest of the day trying to determine how much money this company could make off of this little town. The answer- apparently enough for the company to dedicate resources to reaching out to us. Completely shocking.

On a serious note, though, debt is indiscriminate. It cares not about your age, religion, race, socioeconomic status, or whether you play quarterback in high school or playing the trumpet. It hits everyone. If you are not careful, it will knock you out of commission. All it takes is one missed payment or even one low payment, and it can take a turn for the worse. By taking the time to understand the pros and cons of credit cards, you are equipped to make wise choices concerning them.

One Last Word of Advice: Keep an Eye on Your Finances

Do not just pay your credit card bill when it comes in. Check it for any errors. The sooner you catch them, the easier they should be to fix. Also, look through your credit reports and check for any errors. If you see debts you do not recognize or addresses you have never used, or anything like that, contact someone immediately. The credit report should point you to the correct person to speak with about that charge.

After you have looked through the credit report, sign up for a free credit monitoring service. Your bank may have one you can use. If not, Creditry.com will alert you if there are any changes to your credit report. When you receive that notice, take a quick look to make sure it is something you did. You may not prevent someone from stealing your identity, but you can make it really hard and make them regret it.

Conclusion

I have always told my children that anything can be good, or it can be bad, depending on how you treat it. There are both pros and cons of credit cards. If you are responsible with a credit card, it can absolutely help you and open new doors for you. Those who are not responsible, though, will find themselves suffering. Yes, life happens and things go awry, but being responsible and making good decisions when you are in control is a big step in improving your financial state.

If you are still unsure about having a credit card, read over the list of pros and cons of credit cards again and imagine yourself in each scenario. Working through each, can you see yourself suffering or benefiting from them? Let the answer to that question guide your decision.

Line of Credit vs. Credit Card: Swipe Here or Draw?

Line of Credit vs. Credit Card

When it comes to finances, there are so many terms and definitions that it is easy to get confused. Many of these terms sound similar, and the available definitions on Google often serve to only add to the confusion. Not everyone is a finance guru, so some of us appreciate much simpler definitions. After all, how are we to know what to apply for or what we are getting into if we cannot even understand the textbook definitions?

For the moment, we are going to speak about the two often confused terms and how they differ: line of credit vs credit card. And for those of us who appreciate simplicity, we will be breaking the terms down into useful definitions and explanations. The simpler, the better, in my opinion. Let us begin.

Line of Credit VS Credit Card: Which is Best?

In truth, it is a matter of need and preference. Both offer benefits and risks. Both can be harmful and helpful. Each can be either the answer to your prayer or temptation you do not need. Either way, in order for you to choose between a line of credit vs credit card, you need to understand them on a basic level in order to make an accurate assessment. Below you will find the pertinent information needed to decide on a line of credit vs credit card.

What is a Credit Card?

Yes, it is a card that has credit on it, but how exactly does it work? What does that credit mean? Let’s pretend for a moment that I am yourhow to consolidate credit cards using a personal loanbest friend. You ask me if you can borrow $500 to pay your power bill because your check will not get to you in time. I know that you make enough money to pay me back, so I say “yes”.

However, instead of just handing you $500 cash, I hand you a card, and I say, “There is $500 on this card that you can use. Next month, I will need you to pay me back at least $50. Every month, you can use whatever is available of the $500, but I need at least $50 a month.” It sounds like a good deal, so you accept. These are the basics of a credit card. Like all things in life, there are pros and cons, so let’s get started on those.

Benefits of a Credit Card vs Line of Credit

First and foremost, the credit is available when you need it, as long as you are paying on it. You have the convenience of pulling the card out when you need it and simply swiping it. There is not waiting for the cash to be put in your hand. As long as it is available on the card, you are free to use it.

Minimum payments are usually not very high, so you probably will not have a hard time making those payments. My credit card has a minimum payment of $25 per month. Even during the tight financial months, I can usually squeeze $25 into the budget without too much stress. Also, making timely payments can improve your credit score as well as increase your credit limit on your card.

If you are thinking about taking a credit card, Loanry is always here to help you make the best decisions. We bring you reputable lenders and credit card companies, together with our partner Fiona. If you’re interested in getting a credit card, start here:


Drawbacks of a Credit Card

One of the biggest drawbacks of a credit card is that the minimum payment required is not really helping you at all. That is because the interest on credit cards is compounded. In simple terms, compounded interest means that it is added monthly. If your interest rate is 10%, your interest will be 10% of the balance on the card for that month. Next month, the interest will be calculated again, and added on top of the previous interest. So, if that is the case, what do you suppose happens if your minimum payment is lower than your interest?

In the simplest answer possible, you will dig yourself into deeper debt every single month. Let’s say you have a credit card with a $200 limit, and that card charges 20% interest. You used $150 of your available credit and your minimum payment is $25 per month. Follow along below to learn what happens if you only pay that $25 minimum.

Month 1         Month 2         Month 3         Month 4

Total Due:                  $150               $155               $161               $168.20

Interest Rate:                20%                20%                20%                20%

Interest Due:              $30                 $31                 $32.20            $33.64

Total w/Interest:      $180               $186               $193.20          $201.84

Payment:                     $25                 $25                 $25                 $25

Balance:                    $155               $161               $168.20          $176.84

As you can see, your interest is higher than your payment, so paying only the minimum payment will not get you out of that debt. These numbers are just examples- yours might be higher or lower. The key to getting out of credit card debt is to always make more than the minimum payments. Many cards do not add on interest until the end of the billing cycle. If it is possible for you to pay all or at least some of your balance before then, you will save yourself some cash.

Secured VS Unsecured

As with most loans, there are secured and unsecured credit cards. Secured cards can be of great help to those who have no or low credit. Basically, you pay a deposit on the card, and the company issuing you the card will hold that deposit. Once they have received the deposit, they give you credit. Sometimes, you have to put up the entire amount of credit as a deposit, and sometimes it is just a portion.

For instance, if they are giving you $200 in credit, they might require that you pay as low as $50 as a deposit or may require that you pay the full $200 as a deposit. This minimizes their risk, which is why they are willing to give you credit. If you make timely payments for a set amount of time, the deposit will be returned. Also, they report to the credit bureaus. So even though the cards are secured, they can improve your credit. Unsecured credit cards are simply approved or not according to your previous credit, your ability to repay, and your promise to pay.

What is a Line of Credit?

A line of credit is slightly different from a credit card in how it works and is given. Let’s go back to the example of you and I being besties and you needing some money. You again ask me for money but this time you have different needs. Maybe you want to take some classes at the community college and you have to pay cash. We know that the classes will cost $1,000, but we have no idea what the materials and supplies you need will cost.

This time I say, “I am going to open a bank account and put $3,000 in it. You can borrow anything you need up to that amount. I will leave that money available to you to borrow as often as you need for the next three years as long as you pay the agreed upon interest.”

You take the $1,000 for the classes and register. Two days later, you receive a list of textbooks you need to purchase and find out the total of them is $600. When classes start, you learn that there are lab fees and other costs you had no idea about. Fortunately, it is not a big deal because you still have $2,000 in the account. You take the $800 you need and leave the rest for future use.

The following month, you pay the required interest on what you have borrowed plus $200 on the principle. Now, you still have $1,600 available when you need it. Every month you pay more than the interest, you are replenishing your line of credit. Though some variables may change, this example is the basic idea of a line of credit.

Benefits of a Line of Credit vs Credit Card

One of the major benefits of a line of credit is that you have access to cash. While you can get a cash advance on a credit card, it is generally not a high amount and the interest is often higher. Plus, there are often fees for getting a cash advance. With a line of credit, the expenses associated are often lower than that of a credit card.

You also have flexible repayment options, usually from one year to more than ten years, and the APR is most often lower than that with credit cards. Lastly, there are very few restrictions, and they are an open ended credit line.

Drawbacks of a Line of Credit

First, the interest rates are usually variable, so your interest may change from month to month unlike a fixed rate loan. Lines of credit generally require an account at the financial institution you are borrowing from and a very good credit score. Additionally, you will likely find yourself paying both monthly and yearly maintenance fees so long as the line of credit is open, even if you are not using it.

Secured VS Unsecured

Most lines of credit are unsecured. This means that you provide no collateral. However, as the lending institution assumes a higher risk, it is more difficult to get a line of credit vs credit card, personal installment loan, or other loan options. If you get approved, though, you have a revolving line of credit that can be handy when you are in need.

Similarities and Differences

Now that we have broken down each separately, let’s take a closer look at which is better between a line of credit vs credit card. The two are similar in the sense that in ways, they are both lines of credit. As you generally borrow, payback, and replenish your credit card funds, it is technically a line of credit.

However, a line of credit is often much higher than a credit card. Credit cards are generally a few hundred to a couple of thousand dollar limits, though some may go higher. Lines of credit can start as low as $1,000 and go as high as the institution allows, though most cap out by $100,000. The highest most go are $25,000.

Interest Rate Differences

You will also typically notice a difference in interest rates in a line of credit vs credit card. These differences can vary widely, as well. Some credit cards offer 0% APR for the first year. With lines of credit, you begin paying interest the moment you take out any of your available credit. However, when interest rates begin, lines of credit often run from 9% to 23%.

Credit card interest rates usually start at 23%, though you may find some a little higher or lower. It is also important to remember that with a line of credit, the interest rates- unless stated otherwise- are variable. You may find yourself paying 9% one month and jolting to 23% the next. This makes it rather difficult to budget your payment.

Also, as previously mentioned, most lines of credit require that you have an account with that institution. This is not always the case with credit cards. In fact, some credit card companies do not have other account types.

Lastly, consider the actual rewards when it comes to a line of credit vs credit card. Most credit cards offer some type of reward. It might come in the form of cashback, airline miles, or other rewards. I have yet to find a line of credit that offers any reward beyond borrowing the money and building your credit- if you pay on time.

An Invaluable Lesson

There is one major downside that comes with both options. Regardless of your choice between a line of credit vs credit card, both can impact your credit hugely. If you have never looked at your credit report or really paid attention to it, I am about to tell you something really important, so pay attention: the more you borrow, the lower your credit score. If you borrow more than 30% of your available credit, your credit score drops.

Wait- what? But doesn’t it look good if I can borrow a lot of money?

Yes, unless you are borrowing it. I know, it sounds crazy, but it is true. The percentage of your available credit that you use at a time is called “credit utilization”, and it is a big factor in your credit score. The lower your credit utilization, the better your score. At the same time, they want to see you use credit. There is just a fine line between using it and using it too much.

Let me help you draw that line. If you have a $200 credit limit, the maximum you use should be $60. If you borrow more, try your best to pay it down to 30% before the billing cycle closes. Keep the amount you borrow as low as possible. However, do not ignore your credit. Sadly, using no credit can hurt you about as bad as using too much.

True Story

About five years ago, my husband and I really began trying to clean up our credit. We have been aiming to buy a family home for years and knew our credit would have to improve. We started paying every dime we could to debts, even if it was only $5 at a time. Slowly, we saw our debts dwindling and our scores rising. But goodness, those scores were rising very slowly.

We also made the decision to not use any more credit at all. We did not want any loans to cancel out our other hard work. After three years of paying debts and staying away from credit, we applied for a home loan. And we were denied.

Thinking that maybe our income was too low for approval, I reached out to the finance company. The agent told me, “No, it’s not your income. Actually, that and your work history look great. The problem is you two are not using any credit.”

I have to admit, this completely confused me. Some part of me thought that not using credit and paying for everything out of your income showed great responsibility, but nope.

She went on to explain that lenders want to see that you use credit and are good at paying it. However, they do not want to see you use more than 30%. Learn from our experience: use your credit, just do not abuse it.

Which Should I Get: Line of Credit vs Credit Card?

A major factor in this decision is what you need, or will use, the money for. Are you looking to Credit Card Comparisonmake a large purchase? Paying ongoing extra expenses, like the college example? Or is it more for everyday expenses?

If you just need something to help you put gas in your car or to buy groceries and tissue between checks, a credit card should suffice. If you want to buy a car with cash, need to make repairs to your home, or something similar, you should probably go for a line of credit.

Then again, maybe it is best not to choose between a line of credit vs credit card. Consider applying for both. Just because you have them does not mean you have to use them. If you get approved for both, you can leave them alone until you need them. How much peace of mind would it give you to know that you have money to the side in case you need it? Everyone needs a rainy day fund. Perhaps these credit types can serve as a rainy day fund until you can save one separately.

Line of Credit for Planning Ahead Security

Also, it is likely a good idea to apply for a line of credit long before you actually need it. Let’s say your car breaks down- a common occurrence for the fortunate among us. If you have no money put to the side, or money available to you through credit, you will have to find a way to cover it. If you apply for a line of credit then, it may take a few days or more to be approved. That means you will be stuck worrying about how to get around until you find out if you were approved.

On the other hand, if you applied and got approved for a line of credit months in advance, the stress would lessen. After the initial shock, frustration, and, “What do I do?” reaction, you will remember that you have some money available. You just need to get to the bank to retrieve it. Before you know it, you are back on the road. The bottom line is that it is better to be safe than sorry, so applying for both a credit card and line of credit well before they are needed might turn out to be very beneficial to you.

Conclusion

As you can see, making a choice between a line of credit vs credit card is a personal and situational choice. However, you may find it helpful to have both available to use depending on the situation you face. Another similarity between the two is that lenders for both are widely available. When you are trying to decide where to get a loan or where to credit card shop, Loanry can help. Whether you are searching for a line of credit or a simple credit card, we can help you find a lender that may suit your needs.